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Mash Apache Derby with New OpenOffice 2.0 feature

Hemos posted more than 7 years ago | from the doing-the-mash-ups dept.

52

An anonymous reader writes "Document storage is hot, hot, hot! There has been an explosion of methodologies and tool sets — both open source and proprietary — to fulfill the demand for quickly locating and searching documents. Mash Apache Derby with a new OpenOffice 2.0 feature to create a repository that lets you store, search, and extract ODF documents in a standards-based manner."

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Sirs (3, Funny)

Mipoti Gusundar (1028156) | more than 7 years ago | (#17983968)

If it's having 2.0 in it, it must be good!

Document Storage is hot, hot, hot... (5, Insightful)

Black-Man (198831) | more than 7 years ago | (#17983972)

Because the SEC is hot, hot, hot on the trail of your accounting and related correspondences.

[OT] but ... (0, Offtopic)

jaymzru (1005177) | more than 7 years ago | (#17983982)

If vim can't do it, is it really that useful? *wink*

Great, but please... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984120)

...can we stop "mashing" things. Right now.

It is a silly new word, which brings no new meaning.

There are plenty of good alternatives, technical or not -- combine, connect, link, interface, integrate, etc.

Re:Great, but please... (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984194)

Agreed, I think it's replaced "boxen" as the word that makes me most want to stab people in the face. repeatedly.

Re:Great, but please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984690)

Yeah. Second only to dumbass white kids using ghetto slang like it's perfectly normal, "mashup" makes me want to kill people.

Re:Great, but please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17986366)

I think by going over to their house and mashing up their boxen each time they said it, they would get the message.

Re:Great, but please... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984242)

No problems. Now we will hash instead of mash. Sounds similar, meaning is also similar.
I want hash potatoes tonight for dinner!
And Space Cookies for dessert!

Re:Great, but please... (4, Funny)

zaf (5944) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984338)

...can we stop "mashing" things. Right now.

It is a silly new word, which brings no new meaning.
New? I've been eating mashed potatoes for as long as I can remember

Re:Great, but please... (1)

Short Circuit (52384) | more than 7 years ago | (#17985744)

Don't you get sick of them?

Re:Great, but please... (5, Funny)

beset (745752) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984538)

It's better than "squirting" Apache into OO.org.

One could make any number of Apache squirting jokes but this is /. after all.

Re:Great, but please... (1)

Aptgetupdate (1051164) | more than 7 years ago | (#17987638)

I suggest we use "synergize" -- synergizing is like Mashing 2.0

Out with the old, static Mashing. In with the synergized New Vocabulary Economy.

Holy bloated... (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984226)

OpenOffice, Java and Derby... I hope you have 10GB of RAM to spare.

Re:Holy bloated... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17989196)

OpenOffice, Java and Derby... I hope you have 10GB of RAM to spare.

Derby is actually quite small, it is around 1mb, compared to 42 mb for most MySQL downloads for instance. And it is a very capable database engine. Java takes up a lot of memory to increase performance, true, but only if it is unused memory, and you can decrease the size used with JVM startup parameters and still get very good performance.

OO, ok, I'll give you that. It is probably the biggest app in a given Linux installation, but compared to "the other" fully featured office suite I don't think it is excessively big.

Uh, what? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984290)

An anonymous reader, points us to an IBM article that you can't read without signing up for, gives no summary, and whose title makes no sense "mash apache derby" ? Can we reject stories like this or at least make them clarify what the hell they're even talking about?

Registration-required links make baby jesus cry.

Second that! (2, Informative)

nietsch (112711) | more than 7 years ago | (#17985148)

so true.
And what is even more amazing, after logging in (with bugmenot) the beginning of the article makes no mention what the special feature of OOo actually isThe go straight into installing and building a db. No mention whatsoever what the problem area is and why his solution is a good one. That combined with the silly pageturning thing made me give up reading it.

Re:Uh, what? (1)

moranar (632206) | more than 7 years ago | (#17985360)

Can we reject stories like this[...]?

You know, the Firehose [slashdot.org] is there for exactly that reason.

Re:Uh, what? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 7 years ago | (#17989624)

Firehose is currently only available to some users (not including me, although some of my friends can see it). I clicked on this article to find out what it was about, after reading the title and summary once and still having no clue. Half way down the comments, I still have no idea what it's about.

Re:Uh, what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17985404)

No Thats What Digg is for

Moo (2)

Chacham (981) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984386)

Mash Apache Derby

Don't look now, but your apachiderbis is showing...

Ummmm. Ok (1)

wiredog (43288) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984396)

So you use Apache Derby [apache.org] plus java to do what can already, IIRC, be done with n other document/version control systems. Why is this better? Why should I register with IBM to read a document created by a guy from Northrop Grumman (We Build the B-2 Bomber!)?

Re:Ummmm. Ok (1)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#17986286)

Why should I register with IBM to read a document created by a guy from Northrop Grumman (We Build the B-2 Bomber!)?

He's probably a subcontractor. IBM/NG/LM all share personnel back and forth on projects. It's not uncommon to run into people who've worked for years on projects for one company, while getting their paychecks from somebody else. I think it's because the big contracting companies seem to avoid pilfering staff from each other, and instead just subcontract them out. I can't decide if this sort of 'cooperation' is better or worse for employees.

Welcome to the public sector.

Re:Ummmm. Ok (1)

networkBoy (774728) | more than 7 years ago | (#17987882)

"I can't decide if this sort of 'cooperation' is better or worse for employees."
It's better than joblessnes, but often worse from a work/life balance as you are still always trying to get onto the next big contract.
-nB

Re:Ummmm. Ok (1)

VENONA (902751) | more than 7 years ago | (#17990582)

"Welcome to the public sector."

I'm used to this term referring to .edu, .gov., etc. Did you mean 'private sector'? Or do we need a new term for corporations that have agreed to not recruit from each other's work force (which might *gasp* improve the workers bargaining position), but rather whore their workers out via contract?

That's a hot button for me, as back in the mid-eighties, I saw two semiconductor companies (the only two) in the same small town work a no-pilfering agreement. If you worked for one, the other absolutely would not hire you--even if they had to transfer people in from out of state to fill a position. And we're talking fully paid moves as part of expensive relocation packages, etc. Not cheap to do, IOW. There was a minor flap about it in the local paper, but nothing could ever be proven. It was just an informal agreement, not a formal policy, so there wasn't any paper trail, and I can't recall if it was even illegal. I'm only sure it happened because well *before* the flap, my GF mentioned it to me--she worked in HR.

That's one example of the rapacity of huge corporations, even back then. Here's another. When Intel built their first 9.x fab in Rio Rancho, NM, they got mondo incentives. Enough that the local government had to absorb a large influx of people, with no added financial resources. How bad did it get? Well, central New Mexico is a high desert. The Albuquerque/Rio Rancho area is at about the same altitude as Denver, and drier. I was renting, so I didn't pay any attention to what property taxes where doing, but I do know that finally, on a 4th of July, I turned on the tap and no water came out. This was after some time of decreasing pressure. Wafer fabs are water-intensive. And yes, I was on city water.

I bailed. To this day, I still have a love/hate relationship with Intel. I had significant opportunities, did some of my best work, and worked with some kick-ass engineers and managers--the best in my semiconductor career. Intel put a lot of resources into the new fab, as it was the first full-on production 80386 facility, and was expected to do $1B in it's first year of operation. That was huge, back in the day. Intel was much smaller then, and this was when the Intel/Motorola tide turned, as BatWings failed to answer the '386 challenge.

BTW, I've worked for Moto as well, and Intel hired me away from AMD. So I came in on one of those great emergency deals. They needed me badly enough that the movers showed up the day after became available. My vehicle was loaded, as well as household goods, and I flew out to temp lodgings, a rental car, and some wonderful career stuff, including a chance to do some sweet research, rather than just production process engineering.

There's another tale there--when I applied to Intel, I wanted Oregon. That was closer to home, and where the R&D happened. I was told there were no jobs in Oregon, but there was this New Mexico gig, which would also involve some serious R&D. I ended up shuttling between the two sites as the process was ported (this is complex stuff, with many $ at stake) and the Oregon project lead engineer (whom I'd become fairly friendly with, as we'd been working together for a while now) one day told me that he'd wanted to hire me, but the corporate New Mexico need was greater, he'd come under some pressure, and finally agreed to tell me that the only job was the New Mexico gig. He could only hire me if I declined the New Mexico gig. I blew it off at the time. It was something of an eye-opener (I was pretty young at the time), but I'd never been around a fab where everyone had such long, serious faces. Moto and AMD had both had some seriously fun folk to work with, and the atmosphere was a bit depressing.

OK, there's a quick shot of history for everyone. Now, everyone who thinks that multinationals have become *less* rapacious in the subsequent 20 years raise please your hands. My take is that you:

- Never, *ever* believe what you're told--that's just an invitation to bend over the desk.
- Go with the best combination of bucks and fun you can find, but never lose your focus on what *you* want to do.
- If things don't match your expectations, and you can walk away, do it. You may get an upgraded offer.
- If you don't get an upgraded offer, stay focused on becoming yet more desirable, at what *you* want to do.

If life has a higher purpose than having fun (and to me that definitely means making some sort of contribution) I don't know what it might be. Don't get slotted into something because of where some corporation (or other bureaucracy) that doesn't give a damn about you sees their best financial return.

Re:Ummmm. Ok (2, Interesting)

Kadin2048 (468275) | more than 7 years ago | (#17993768)

When I said "public sector," I meant 'the portion of the private sector which is devoted in whole or large part to fulfilling the demands of the public, i.e. governmental, sector; in particular U.S. government contractors.' The field is dominated by a number of well-known and very large players, which compete with each other on one hand, but also seem to have certain gentlemanly agreements on the other. They are, for most intents and purposes, essentially in a grey area somewhere between temp agencies which only serve the government, and wholesale private government agencies.

Most people who haven't been involved in the Federal government don't have any idea how much of the day-to-day operations of the USG is handled by contractors; I can personally assure you that if all the contractors decided not to show up for work one day, the government would literally stop.

Re:Ummmm. Ok (1)

VENONA (902751) | more than 7 years ago | (#18007216)

Not sure I agree with Kadin2048's definition of 'public sector'. But especially as contractors have been in so much in the news lately (not just Blackwater and others of the same sort), I wish someone with mod points would hang an 'interesting' on the parent post.

Re:Ummmm. Ok (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 7 years ago | (#17986888)

"a document created by a guy from Northrop Grumman (We Build the B-2 Bomber!)?"
Gee I don't know. Probably because Northrop Grumman has a lot of experience with managing huge amounts of documents.
BTW Northrop Grumman also built the Lunar Lander.

Sharepoint Competitor (2, Interesting)

blantonl (784786) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984414)

I assume that this is a competing approach to the Office 2007/Sharepoint components that Microsoft has.

Well done!

hot hot hot air balloon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984420)

the document-storage-software (aka enterprise-content-management) company I used to work for couldnt even pay the programmers wages. This seems to be a trend in this branch. Lots of marketing, no new ideas.

What's so new about this... (5, Informative)

rongage (237813) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984484)

Haven't these folk heard of Web-DAV before?

Re:What's so new about this... (1)

dozer (30790) | more than 7 years ago | (#17987108)

Unfortunately Microsoft killed WebDAV [atarex.com] for everybody. They're so good at that it's scary.

Now, according to Jeremy Allison [linuxworld.com] , CIFS seems to be the best way to share stuff. I think he's right. At least, I can't think of any more reliable cross-platform file share technology.

Sigh.

"Mash" my fist and your face ... (4, Funny)

cascadingstylesheet (140919) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984492)

... and a stupid new buzzword is stopped in it's tracks! ;)

Can we please not "mash" anything??? (4, Funny)

nathan s (719490) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984504)

I know it's too late, but if you have any heart at all, please do not spread this extremely annoying use of the word any further. I do not want Apache on my dinner plate, nor in any way do I want it smashed, pulverized, or otherwise rendered into unrecognizable goop like the word "mash" itself has apparently been. I've suffered through blogs and vlogs and podcasts and bennifers and brangelinas - and even Lewis Carroll would be turning in his grave at these dreadful portmanteaus which are less about expanding the language and more about general journalistic laziness. othrwse we mit as wll all uz IMspk and wrdsmsh all r communc8s 4 lezins sak k thx

Re:Can we please not "mash" anything??? (1)

dedalus2000 (704571) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984808)

yes i agree the use of the word "mash" should be distilled to it's essential form...

Re:Can we please not "mash" anything??? (1)

Essef (12025) | more than 7 years ago | (#17986216)

Actually, there is nothing wrong with the word Mashup. I've seen several people now complaining that yet another neologism has creeped into the already crowded web vernacular. It's just a "relatively" new word that means something "relatively" new. It's not even indicative of the web being overrun by the mindless masses and buzzword junkies, that happened long ago.

S.

Re:Can we please not "mash" anything??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17986540)

Nothing wrong with it? What's RIGHT with it?

There's nothing new about what people are doing when they use this word. For example, someone has integrated a Business Software Suite with a Relational Database.

Yeah, it's a MASHUP, man. It's like we're jamming ... but with, y'know, Java.

Uh huh. Try this bullshit with a chick and see how far it gets you.

While we're at it, can we stop "blogging"? (1)

unsigned integer (721338) | more than 7 years ago | (#17986612)

Seriously. It's a ridiculous sounding word that sounds like I'm regurgitating my food.

Um, Hurp, Caugh, BLOOOGGGGGGGGGGGG.

Re:Can we please not "mash" anything??? (1)

p3d0 (42270) | more than 7 years ago | (#18002132)

I've suffered through blogs and vlogs and podcasts and bennifers and brangelinas...
Don't forget Filliam H. Muffman [urbandictionary.com] .

copy and paste (-1, Offtopic)

Turn-X Alphonse (789240) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984612)

I'd just like OO.org to you know.. do simple things.

Yesterday it crashed on me whenever I tried to copy and paste something into Gaim. It was bloody annoying and made no sense.

We need straight DMS integration (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17984730)

I would love to have OO being able to talk to docmgr http://wiki.docmgr.org/ [docmgr.org] . Via Webdav or whatever. But storing documents directly in a DMS instead of filesystem would be marvelous. Including revision control a.s.o

Re:We need straight DMS integration (1)

dorkygeek (898295) | more than 7 years ago | (#17985260)

OOo can already be used with any WebDAV enabled server. Just enter the collection URI in the name field of the open document dialog, and off you go.

Re:We need straight DMS integration (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17988602)

But storing documents directly in a DMS instead of filesystem would be marvelous.

Yes, because having to wait for some unscaling FOSS-server to process their hunderd-MB Excel-file is what makes users happy, right?

Alfresco (1)

cybrthng (22291) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984838)

I like the Alfresco approach the best myself, especially 2.0 coming out. Access, Policies, Rules, Indexing, Portability and auditing. Over the web, through web dav and version control on top of that. Hard to beat.

It's Called a "Web Server"... (3, Funny)

littlewink (996298) | more than 7 years ago | (#17984934)

and they've increased in number since the early '90's.

Speaking of which... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17985584)

Hot hot hot! [ifilm.com]

To Serve Man (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 7 years ago | (#17986440)

From the non-registration part of the site:

Document storage is hot, hot, hot! There has been an explosion of methodologies and tool sets -- both open source and proprietary -- to fulfill the demand for quickly locating and searching documents. Enabling technologies like Alfresco, Sharepoint, or my favorite, TWiki, are powerful, but they have a fairly high learning curve -- or worse, store the documents in a proprietary format. There must be an easier way. Let's take Derby and mash it with a new feature in OpenOffice 2.0, the Open Document Format (ODF). Using these tools, you can create a repository that lets you store, search, and extract ODF documents in a standards-based manner. Also learn to use the power of the improved XML features of IBM® DB2®, Version 9 to make this solution easier to implement.

Get it? You like Apache Derby, but you REALLY, TRULY, DEEP IN YOUR HEART, want to buy IBM® DB2®, Version 9, to avoid messy open source and a "fairly high learning curve" THANK GOD (and IBM) for DB2. All Hail closed source, and can I have a side of "service contract" with that, please?

'Registration' sites not a problem, article is (1)

Bearhouse (1034238) | more than 7 years ago | (#17986818)

Cmon guys, stop trolling about 'registration' sites when you can just use bugmenot (http://www.bugmenot.com/) to get a sign-in. But then you'll have to download the pdf... As for the article, other posters are right - better solutions already exist than those outlined in this 'slashvertising' piece for DB2. As for local search - Google desktop, anyone?

Is it better than iManage? (1)

charnov (183495) | more than 7 years ago | (#17988196)

All I want to know is it better than iManage. If it is, you can save me about $50K and rid the last piece of infrastructure tying me to Microsoft.

"new feature of OpenOffice 2.0" (1)

rodia (1031082) | more than 7 years ago | (#17995244)

In case somebody wonders what the miraculous "new feature" is: the cited article says
"mash it with a new feature in OpenOffice 2.0, the Open Document Format (ODF)"
wow. I somehow expected more.

r.

Chris Tucker writes for /. (1)

module0000 (882745) | more than 7 years ago | (#17997038)

..."Hot, Hot, Hot!"...!?!? Can we start making fun of them for saying that yet or are we still debating the article?
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