Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

The Academy For Software Engineering: a High School For Developers

Unknown Lamer posted about 9 months ago | from the start-'em-young dept.

Programming 56

rjmarvin writes "The Academy for Software Engineering, right off of Manhattan's Union Square, is in its second year of educating students for a future in computer science and software engineering. No entrance exams, no admission standards, just an opportunity for any student interested in software to take specialized classes like robotics and programming, go on trips to companies like Google and Facebook, and spend summers interning at Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase before heading to college and into the workforce, powering the next wave of innovation as members of the tech workforce in New York's burgeoning 'Silicon Alley.'"

cancel ×

56 comments

uhh... (3, Insightful)

buddyglass (925859) | about 9 months ago | (#45334965)

No entrance exams, no admission standards...

So is it absurdly expensive or do they use a lottery system?

Re:uhh... (4, Funny)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 9 months ago | (#45335007)

Like much of the tech sector, they keep costs down by replacing most students with robots and outsourcing the rest to India.

Re:uhh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335015)

neither - any old drongo can go, so long as they pay. Thus, if you're talented, you'll waste your time there :-(

Re:uhh... (1)

plover (150551) | about 9 months ago | (#45335133)

Obviously, the students at that school are already better educated than you. They can read. It's a public school that does not charge students.

Re:uhh... (1)

buddyglass (925859) | about 9 months ago | (#45339635)

You confuse unwillingness to read with inability to read.

Re:uhh... (1)

plover (150551) | about 9 months ago | (#45346383)

Same net effect - the ignorant remain ignorant.

Re:uhh... (1)

buddyglass (925859) | about 8 months ago | (#45352573)

On the contrary! Without reading the article I correctly guessed they'd need to limit enrollment either by way of high tuition or a lottery. Then, after asking which one it was, I got the answer from fellow Slashdot readers without actually having to read the article. Score.

Re:uhh... (1)

plover (150551) | about 8 months ago | (#45371625)

LOL!

Of course, you're now claiming to be educated by people who generally can't bother to RTFA. That's still not a claim to be proud of.

Re:uhh... (1)

rjmarvin (3001897) | about 9 months ago | (#45335053)

Lottery system

Re:uhh... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335121)

I sometimes believe that RTFA is a not a arcane art but a dying art. Second paragraph under the picture says .......

"The AFSE has unscreened enrollment, meaning admission decisions aren’t based on academic performance. All students need to do is attend an open house, apply, and hope their lottery number is picked."

Re:uhh... (1)

TWiTfan (2887093) | about 9 months ago | (#45335173)

Like all hopes of economic advancement in the U.S. today, it all hinges on winning the lottery.

Re:uhh... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335573)

Like all hopes of economic advancement in the U.S. today, it all hinges on winning the lottery.

I'm sure it feels that way looking out from your parents basement, but you can get ahead in the U.S. by hard work. This is a land of equal opportunity but what you people want is equal outcomes.

But worry not because by the time our current majority party has finished gutting the middle class, we'll all live on equal slices of the public assistance pie.

Re:uhh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45336003)

I know many people who do hard work. One guy works 7 days a week, with at least three part-time jobs (the best he can get) in order to provide a bare existence for him and his family.

It is all about luck, family support, and an opportunity coming your way. One can work like a dog and still be one flu away from homelessness.

Want a decent job in the US? You have to get a J. D. after your name, which takes money to do. IT needs certificates (MCSE, CCIE, RHCE) before HR even takes a look at you, much less stops routing your resume to the round file.

It is a matter of a dice roll. The trick is to try rolling the dice as many times as you can until you get a notch higher, prove yourself, repeat. The goal is to make manager and get yourself out of the cert treadmills if in IT, or a partner in a law firm. This is difficult because H-1Bs and 1Bs (Companies will hire people without work permits because the fines are so low and the tax advantages so high) will always have preference over you unless you have something noticeably better.

Re:uhh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335445)

There has to be some soft of system and it's probably limited by school district anyway. If you look at the average high school there's maybe a handful of people that consider themsevles or thier peers would consider them 'computer nerds', then out of that subset there's only a smaller handful that can actually hack any type of development or code creation on thier own to excel, and when it comes to brass tasks it seperates them from the 'computer nerds' who are just websurvers who talk shit with no life and those with real geek cred.

Re:uhh... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335553)

Isolation from the rest of the populace is the last thing neck-beards need. There will be no hope for this endangered species and the gene pool will die out.

captcha: relative

Sources (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335005)

http://www.linkedin.com/pub/robert-marvin-cic/10/5b1/771?_mSplash=1

It's like reading a flyer now.

Re:Wrong source (1)

rjmarvin (3001897) | about 9 months ago | (#45335025)

That's the wrong LinkedIn profile, dipstick.

Re:Wrong source (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 9 months ago | (#45335029)

He must be a pretty smart dipstick if he's posting on the Internet. My dipstick just sort of sits in my car all day until I want to check my oil.

Re:Wrong source (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335205)

YOUR OIL LEVEL IS 72 mL LOW

This advert brought to you by (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335031)

The Academy for Software Engineering.

Warning! (1)

BlindRobin (768267) | about 9 months ago | (#45335033)

Trust issue and cynicism trigger.

Visas (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335035)

How many H1-B visas are needed for the students

Accreditation? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335065)

Is a diploma from this academy recognized by
1) the state? - otherwise it can't replace high school
2) universities? - otherwise graduates won't be accepted
3) businesses? - otherwise graduates won't get past HR

No info about this on the site anywhere. No listed fees, curricula, sessions, class sizes.
No info about staff. Online forms look like crap. No TOS.
The site is pretty much a one-pager.

Screams fly-by-nite to me... I vote for "just another scam"

Re:Accreditation? (3, Informative)

plover (150551) | about 9 months ago | (#45335137)

It's a fully accredited NYC public high school. RTFA before posting your "OMG SCAM SCARE" nonsense.

First failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335083)

"The students who walk our halls"

If you really look for meat to walk on your corridors, then keep waiting.

Me, i would either go to a local university or enroll in online courses, provided that they have a proper backing.

Re:First failure (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45336155)

It's a high school.

Jeebus Keyrist...does no one RTFA anymore?

The education part sounds great... (2, Insightful)

Bob_Who (926234) | about 9 months ago | (#45335125)

But why should you do evil and work for the criminals in the financial sector? Have you no sense of ethics ?

Just because an inner city kid is poor and needs a free education doesn't mean he should do the dirty work.

JPMorgan owes a lot more than 13 billion and a free tech farm for grooming new corporate fall guys.

Why should crime pay when its too big to fail, with labor that is too small to pay, except for the dirty work.

I'm glad for the free school but I can't help but be cynical about Wall Street.

Re:The education part sounds great... (1)

marienf (140573) | about 9 months ago | (#45335247)

second that.

Thie program comes with a brainwashing guarantee.
I mean: Google, Facebook and JPMorgan!

War is Peace!
Privacy is a crime!
Sell your friends!
Debt is your own fault!
Shut Up And Shop!

Re:The education part sounds great... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335459)

This post is "insightful?" Since when is profit bad? Without profit, you would have literally nothing except what you could physically make with your own hands. No food, no clothes, and especially no electronics or computers. Who do you think finances all these companies, fairies? No, Wall Street and their investors. So get off your high horse and stop complaining about "criminals" in Wall Street you Communist! Go live with nothing, and I mean nothing, for a year then I'll listen. Until then you're nothing but a hypocritical Communist agitator.

Re:The education part sounds great... (0)

Bob_Who (926234) | about 9 months ago | (#45335879)

This post is "insightful?" Since when is profit bad? Without profit, you would have literally nothing except what you could physically make with your own hands. No food, no clothes, and especially no electronics or computers. Who do you think finances all these companies, fairies? No, Wall Street and their investors. So get off your high horse and stop complaining about "criminals" in Wall Street you Communist! Go live with nothing, and I mean nothing, for a year then I'll listen. Until then you're nothing but a hypocritical Communist agitator.

Pull your head out of your ass. I never mentioned anything that you just made up and interjected. I never said anything about Capitalism or Communism, because its not the cold war or the 20th Century anymore. We're not discussing the elimination of clothing and computers or electronics and re-entering the stone age or even of believing in fairies. All off that came out of your ass, and yet your head appears to be firmly implanted there.

So try to pay attention this time, because this is not a campaign of nihilism, hypocrisy or communism or any ism. Its simple.

WE MUST STOP WHITE COLLAR CRIME ON WALL STREET AND PUNISH INDIVIDUALS THAT BREAK THE LAW.

We should also remove the incentives that reward that behavior. This will be a challenge and we must be deliberate and resolute in accomplishing this goal. This is not a political campaign, its the LAW. Just because you work in the financial sector doesn't mean you get to lie and cheat and steal. Its just that simple.

So are you a little dim or are you working for the scumbags?

I have nothing against anyone's political preference. This is NOT a red team blue team issue, although it seems a convenient distraction to make it one. This issue should concern every citizen regardless of their political party, race, creed, sex, age, education, IQ or species! This is about our willful ignorance of serious crime, bad judgement and risky behaviors that have no upside for the 99% who were left to bail these jerks out.

WHERE'S THE OUTRAGE AMERICA?

It certainly can't be in this guys knee jerk indignation and Commie calling bullshit.

I'm glad these kids get a free education. I praise Wall Street for all of the good that they do. But I'm gonna be certain that we NAIL them for gaming the system. THAT'S THE LAW. And besides, its just the right thing to do.

Re:The education part sounds great... (1)

bzipitidoo (647217) | about 9 months ago | (#45337091)

Wish more people were like you. Seems most people can't be bothered to fight oppression, as long as it seems mild or remote.

There's all this government hate, yet people will not fight government abuse of law enforcement to raise revenue. I'm talking things like speed traps, red light camera tickets, parking meter programs, as well as the many schemes not involving cars. Then the local governments get scammed themselves when they float bonds and can't manage to secure a competitive interest rate, thanks to big banks having rigged that market. Throw the book at the little person, but Too Big To Fail is also Too Big To Jail.

Re: The education part sounds great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335943)

As a small business owner who has made it for years without an investor, I can tell you we could make it without Wallstreet. Then again, I just kind of hate finance people. It's the engineers and the entrepreneurs that make things work.

Re:The education part sounds great... (1)

csumpi (2258986) | about 9 months ago | (#45336089)

JPMorgan owes a lot more than 13 billion

Chunk of change, compared to the billions the US government sends down the toilet _every_ _single_ _day_. I'm not saying that makes it OK, but we should start looking at the real problems instead of the smoke and mirrors talking points.

Re:The education part sounds great... (1)

Bob_Who (926234) | about 9 months ago | (#45343739)

JPMorgan owes a lot more than 13 billion

Chunk of change, compared to the billions the US government sends down the toilet _every_ _single_ _day_. I'm not saying that makes it OK, but we should start looking at the real problems instead of the smoke and mirrors talking points.

Exactly right. That is the perfect place to start. Suddenly the echo of ideologues' mantras drown out the silent uncertainty that we all must feel as we look at the incomprehensible scale of 330 Million Americans and another 7 billion bound to our international trade agreements. I just have one question, how is that supposed to look in a perfect world? If this looks broken now then what does fixed look like? There is no ideology that can alter the current reality in any significant way. Not Paul Ryan, Rand Paul, Jesus, Buddha, or the Wizard of Oz. Not Reagan or Putin or Stalin or anyone has a fix for this. We are a growth oriented system on a finite depleted physical resource. Capitalism can't work if it hits a ceiling and can't grow. Neither can civilization, really. So we have a much bigger problem than ideological differences. We just can't seem to grasp the sheer enormity and breadth of the human population.

  There are double the humans on earth today than when I was born. When I was born there were more humans alive on earth than had ever lived and died before. So when you think about it, economics is a quaint little past time that has no control over that reality. If the only way capital can provide for 7 billion is if we all are engaged in productive and profitable enterprise, with 0% unemployment 0% tax 0% debt 0% disease and suffering and 100% bought and paid for humanity with not even one deadbeat on earth, then how would that function? Wouldn't that be almost like how it is now, only nobody would owe anything to anyone? And isn't that just bad for business when you get down to it? How would wall street get ahead if didn't need to buy or borrow or steal? I guess my point is that success depends on others failure, or else no one has a distinct superior position. As soon as you think you've got a handle on ruling the world a bunch of angry villagers will eventually come to chop off your head. Rinse, lather, repeat. I think I have lapsed into gloomy nihilism. I better go listen to some Jimi Hendrix play the blues..

Re:The education part sounds great... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 9 months ago | (#45336461)

But why should you do evil and work for the criminals in the financial sector? Have you no sense of ethics ?

Just because an inner city kid is poor and needs a free education doesn't mean he should do the dirty work.

Depends on the goal. Why do people keep wanting to be videogame developers (enough so that the likes of EA can basically pay less than minimum wage and 100 hour weeks)?

You tell a kid who grew up in poverty that they can get an education that gets them into places like JPMorgan and such? Well damn, the dollar signs light up - from nothing to an in with the financial sector - it's the American Dream! Sure it requires holding your nose a bit (something they probably won't find out until they actually start), and the pay isn't that great (IT is a cost center - unless you're a trader making the money, you're draining the company), but damn, working in finance!

Of course, the real goal is to train more code monkeys to create excess supply...

Even my old high school is doing this (2)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 9 months ago | (#45335157)

Well, some of it. I went to a fine arts high school and I heard from some old classmates that they've started teaching web design in the art classes there - including HTML and lower end web programming. Considering how many of us ended up in IT that may not be a bad idea. Previously, the only tech stuff they taught was theater lighting.

Can't be any worse than Common Core, regardless.

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (1)

internerdj (1319281) | about 9 months ago | (#45335281)

That is all well and good but if we are starting career training in high school where do the students get the breadth of training they need to actually choose what they are interested in?

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45337349)

Their hobbies and interests. If they aren't self motivated enough to ask themselves what they want to be and look into things themselves then they have no self direction and that usually leads to not caring about any of the rest of their education. My wife is a teacher and she says that almost without fail the students that struggle have no idea what they want to do when they grow up or they want to be a "video gamer". Those students that have an idea, no matter how outrageous it may be or even if it changes by the hour, have more motivation to try and perform better than those that have aspiration at all.

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45340689)

This is the American education system we're talking about. You don't get breadth of training any more, you get memorization for the standardized test. It was already starting in that direction when I went through school (now age 38), and it's only gotten worse.

I would like to see them reduce the standardized testing, increase teacher training and collaboration (makes for better teachers), increase teacher resource funding (more cool things that might engage the students)

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (1)

Grax (529699) | about 9 months ago | (#45335327)

Lincoln Nebraska has a technology focus program http://itfp.lps.org/ [lps.org]

In the entertainment industry, it has produced an editor for Pawn Stars and an Emmy winner, among others. I don't have any information on how many successful software developers it has produced.

http://itfp.lps.org/alumni.html [lps.org] http://itfp.lps.org/graphics/Kelly.htm [lps.org]

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335413)

That isn't much different than when they used to try to teach basic to our hapless class in middle school for two or three months every year. Doesn't mean that everyone can hack it, most couldn't I guess it's just out there to spark any intrest of those who could.

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45335715)

I went to a fine arts high school and I heard from some old classmates that they've started teaching web design in the art classes there - including HTML and lower end web programming

They should throw in some courses in heating and air conditioning repair or nursing instead.

Seriously. They're better careers.

Those are the kinds of courses that high schools used to teach.

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 9 months ago | (#45337841)

Well, a comprehensive high school still does. The first high school I went to had an auto mechanic class and a practice hair dressing salon for electives. Unfortunately since they had such a broad focus, they had little funding left over for the more frivolous things in life - e.g. art and music. When I switched to the fine arts school, I lost out on the opportunity to take any more shop classes, but I gained the opportunity to take studio art and ballet. Fair trade to me. (Didn't hurt that the fine arts school was all honors classes and had a 100% graduation rate, unlike the comprehensive school I left.)

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45338285)

It would be interesting to compare graduates from the two schools many years after graduation.

My high school had a fair balance between vocational paths and advanced placement college prep - which was my path. A friend of mine took Auto Body instead. Now he runs his own shop, lives in a gated golf course community, and drives a Dodge Viper to work. I work in a fabric covered box under the constant threat of being outsourced and commute in my wife's Honda Civic.

My son will go to the same high school that I did. Only now there's no vocational electives whatsoever. If I don't take him into the garage and teach him how to use a table saw, he'll never learn.

Re:Even my old high school is doing this (1)

sandytaru (1158959) | about 9 months ago | (#45340403)

I bumped into two guys who graduated a year before I did from the fine arts school, and both are big wigs in tech startups (one is the CEO.) I'm not a big wig nor do I work for a tech startup, but I'm doing quite well. I worked with a graduate from the comprehensive school at my last job.... Last I heard she was working as a front desk assistant at a health clinic for $13/hour. I don't know what her track was at the comprehensive school, but I do know she was in the National Guard for a long time.

I'm darn proud of my Honda Accord with 213K miles on it.

the impetus behind this is pure evil (1)

nimbius (983462) | about 9 months ago | (#45335591)

managers complain to their C-Levels about lack of talent, C-Levels respond by creating a "school" to "teach" programming to students, which im sure is basically structured conveniently and entirely around their versions of SAP implementations or Oracle middleware mainframe glue. Once you emerge from this 'school' you're kind of worthless to anyone but, surprise, the corporations funneling cash into this education system. And because you couldnt get into a college with your limited expertise in brain-damaging shit like ABAP and PL/B youre likely going to rock a cubefarm wageslave position where you make about as much as a TSA screener.

in reality you dont need a programming highschool unless you intend to spend your life doing menial labour for the code mines of some archane division of a megacorp the rest of your life. Either go to college and learn CS, go to a trade school and learn CIS, or pick this stuff up as you go and work your way along from tech support to admin or dev.

at least it's better then theory loaded CS college (2)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 9 months ago | (#45336135)

at least it's better then theory loaded CS colleges where you learn skills that give a big skills gap on the stuff needed to do the job.

Re:at least it's better then theory loaded CS coll (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45336375)

Yes, CS is mainly about computational science theory. That's the point.

No serious CS course is gonna teach Java 7 Programming with Oracle 11g

Re:at least it's better then theory loaded CS coll (1)

frank_adrian314159 (469671) | about 9 months ago | (#45336421)

That's debatable. At least with "theory loaded CS colleges" you learn the theory. And, if you have the moxie to get an actual CS degree, you're probably not going to have a lot of trouble filling in that "big skills gap" on your own time, which generally means having knowledge of the programming language/toolkit du jour (and which is, surprisingly enough, what you'll be asked to do on the job as a programmer in the real world - do you really think that companies pay for technology training anymore?).

For "pure" IT? Setting up, configuring, and maintaining systems? Maybe your path makes sense, but even in this realm, I've seen a lot more scripting recently that tends to be maintained over a long enough time frame that, as such, needs to be done with a modicum of design skill. And most of that would benefit from knowing theory.

Universities are not vocational schools (3, Interesting)

perpenso (1613749) | about 9 months ago | (#45338313)

at least it's better then theory loaded CS colleges where you learn skills that give a big skills gap on the stuff needed to do the job.

Universities are not vocational schools. If you want to learn the languages and operating systems that are used at a job ***today*** then go to your local junior college (JC) and take the relevant vocational classes. JCs do a fine job in this regard. If you want the theory and background knowledge that is more persistent, that will outlast the programming languages and operating systems that are popular today then you go to the university. In the university you are often expected to learn the programming languages and operating systems of the day on your own time. As you will have to do throughout your career. Even things necessary for class are often on your own time. For example in a compilers class the class time may be mostly spent on compiler theory. You may be offered an optional session led by a TA to introduce you to lex and yacc (used to implement your compiler) but you are expected to learn these mostly on your own. Similar story in AI classes, theory in class, a TA session for LISP or Prolog, but mostly you learn the programming language on your own time. Programming languages and operating systems are implementation details, they change over time. The theory tends to last a bit longer.

I have two books from the early 1980s. A book on programming MS-DOS and Knuth Volume 3: Sorting and Searching. The former is full of what was once useful info for a job and went into the recycle bin when cleaning out the garage recently. The later is theory and is still a valuable and useful reference today and still sits on my bookshelf.

If you have a skills gap after the university you made some sort of mistake. At the university you are surround by people (professors and fellow students) with an incredibly variety of skills and knowledge, you have incredible resources (hardware and software) available, if you are not doing some sort of independent study on your own you are making a mistake. If you are doing nothing other than homework assignment on the default hardware using the default languages you are making a mistake, you are making yourself less attractive to employers. Assuming of course you don't have a job or some other "legitimate" demand on your time.

Re:Universities are not vocational schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45342723)

Instead of learning on my own I just did the minimum to get by while I was out doing beer bongs and trying to get laid. Due to all the social connections I forged in college, I'm now your boss and I need you to come in on Saturday.

Re:Universities are not vocational schools (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 9 months ago | (#45343289)

Instead of learning on my own I just did the minimum to get by while I was out doing beer bongs and trying to get laid. Due to all the social connections I forged in college, I'm now your boss and I need you to come in on Saturday.

No, you are only the boss of other ticket punchers. Those who actually learned something have options and you are not one of them.

Re:the impetus behind this is pure evil (2)

mlts (1038732) | about 9 months ago | (#45336431)

Nail, head hit. What is needed is to teach the basics about languages, so jumping from perl to java to ABAP to Scheme to Ada is a relatively minor item (you figure out syntax, variable convention, etc... perhaps procedural versus lambda based, etc.)

After these basics, one can learn Java and be a Java dev, but when that peters out, it doesn't take much to grab an O'Reilly guide and start programming in PHP, Python, or perhaps even back to perl.

In most languages [1], a ring buffer is a ring buffer. A queue is a queue, a stack is a stack.

What I dislike are these "tech schools" who teach something so dated that it means nothing. For example, "fiber optics". What is that? Is that level 1 networking? Is that physically laying down the cable and lighting it up? Is that not looking down a single mode fiber with remaining eye? CS degrees tend to be more generic, but at least the concepts stay constant, barring a fundamental change to architecture [2].

Of course, it would be nice to merge CS and MIS, where one learns both the programming aspect as well as the human factor that is needed in IT to survive.

[1]: Good luck trying to do a double-ended queue in LOGO, so I say "most" to cover those.

[2]: I've always wanted a set of FPGAs on a machine so when security sensitive code is executed, there is a Harvard architecture "core" made for that job, and after the tasks are done, it is back to the von Neumann world. This wouldn't be fast, but it definitely would help in the security department.

programmers now a commodity (1)

apcullen (2504324) | about 9 months ago | (#45335935)

The point of this is to turn programmers into even more of a commodity. The idea isn't to produce labor, the idea is to produce cheap domestic labor.

AKA ... (1)

PPH (736903) | about 9 months ago | (#45336291)

Little Lord Fauntleroy Academy for Albino Hemophiliacs.

Nothing new! (1)

www.sorehands.com (142825) | about 9 months ago | (#45336865)

This is not a new thing. In the 1976 the Mario Umana Harbor School of Science and technology was formed as a partnership between MIT and the Boston Public Schools. We never got tours of Facebook or Google, but that might be because they didn't exist at the time. We got tours of the MIT museums and labs.

Of course, who doesn't know about the Bronx High School of Science.

Check for New Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...