Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Flash Is Dead; Long Live OpenFL!

timothy posted about 5 months ago | from the pride-wenteh-already dept.

Graphics 166

First time accepted submitter lars_doucet writes "I am a 15-year Flash veteran and nobody hates to say this more than me: Flash is dying, and the killer is Adobe. Where to now? HTML5 doesn't help me with native targets, and Unity is proprietary just like Flash was — 'don't worry, we'll be around forever! And so sorry about that neglected bug report — we're busy.' I'm putting my bets on OpenFL, a Haxe-based, fully open-source implementation of the Flash API that might just please both Flash refugees and longtime Flash haters alike. My article discusses my experiences with it and gives a brief overview for newcomers. In short: I can keep making Flash games if I want, but with the same codebase I can also natively target Win/Mac/Linux desktops, mobile, and more, without having to mess with Adobe AIR or other virtual machines."

cancel ×

166 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Go emscripten (0)

Sla$hPot (1189603) | about 5 months ago | (#46518051)

Nuf said

Re:Go emscripten (0)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 5 months ago | (#46518479)

It's really not.

Re:Go emscripten (1)

Sla$hPot (1189603) | about 5 months ago | (#46518531)

It is more cross platform than anything else out there.
With an asm.js optimized browser, it is also very competitive, performance wise.
In that respect you could probably impliment openFL in emscripten :/
No installation required.

Sooooo..... (1)

homey of my owney (975234) | about 5 months ago | (#46518059)

Is that a good thing?

Did netcraft report it? (0)

morcego (260031) | about 5 months ago | (#46518061)

Because, you know, this is slashdot. We won't believe something is dead until netcraft reports it...

Re:Did netcraft report it? (1, Informative)

Pahroza (24427) | about 5 months ago | (#46518851)

I think the verb you're looking for is confirm, not report.

Native Targets? (0)

Improv (2467) | about 5 months ago | (#46518063)

Flash is no more native than HTML5. At this point it doesn't make sense to "place bets" on Flash at all, unless like the article author you've spent many years on Flash and are not interested in change.

Re:Native Targets? (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518083)

You missed the part where OpenFL compiles to C++.

Re:Native Targets? (3, Insightful)

Improv (2467) | about 5 months ago | (#46518161)

So what? Perl can compile to C too, by bundling the interpreter into your target binary. Windows apps can compile "to native" as well. Neither makes it exactly native, similarly to having your app interpreted by a native HTML5 engine is.

The most native way something can be for a platform is to be written directly for its platform, bound directly to its APIs. Anything but that gets very conceptually fuzzy. And if you're worried about this for performance reasons, you should look at the Quakelikes that have been ported to HTML5.

Re:Native Targets? (2)

Improv (2467) | about 5 months ago | (#46518175)

(I missed part of a sentence in there ; windows apps can compile "to native" as well using WINE)

Re:Native Targets? (2)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518219)

Okay, so that's a semantic difference then. If by "native" you mean "original source code written in the original language" than by that definition it's not native. I'm trying to clarify that it's not using a virtual machine, or relying on a plugin, whatever you want to call that.

Re:Native Targets? (2)

Improv (2467) | about 5 months ago | (#46518309)

My point is that with modern VMs and JITs and partial nativisation and other systems/PL technologies, you no longer should care whether something "runs native", and that that's a distinction that is so blurred anyhow that it barely makes sense to talk about it. It may have once been important and simple, but nowadays it is neither.

Re:Native Targets? (5, Informative)

ThePhilips (752041) | about 5 months ago | (#46518653)

Native vs. interpreted vs. JITed discussion is a moot. (They are all fast enough. On one side. On the other side, many code generators/translators add enough cruft for the code to often lose performance compared to the JITed/interpreted execution.)

The problem is with the libraries required by the run-time. One can compile Java application into a native app (using GCJ), but it is of little use since you still need the Java run-time. IOW, you are still poised to run into run-time deployment issues (version conflicts, local configuration, paths, etc).

Compilation to native code has value only if it allows you to create an application which doesn't have external dependencies or the external dependencies are very easy to manage.

Re:Native Targets? (1)

Lennie (16154) | about 5 months ago | (#46519067)

And they keep saying Android apps are native too.

It's all hilarious.

Re:Native Targets? (4, Informative)

ynp7 (1786468) | about 5 months ago | (#46518209)

If I'm not mistaken Haxe "compiles to C++" by interpreting the code into actual C++ source, which then gets compiled into a native binary with a standard C++ compiler.

Re:Native Targets? (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518243)

Correct. I'm not an expert on the Haxe compiler, but I'm pretty sure it also has the ability (via hxlibc or hxcpp libraries) to directly compile Haxe to native binaries, skipping the intermediate C++ source step, but it can also create those too.

Re:Native Targets? (3, Interesting)

ynp7 (1786468) | about 5 months ago | (#46518297)

Since you're a big HaxeFlixel guy, can you point me in the right direction to actually getting a working dev environment going on Windows? I tried a couple of times, but gave up because even the example projects would throw incomprehensible error messages when I test compiled. Only information I've been able to find on the errors was other people having the same problem, but no actual solutions.

Re:Native Targets? (3)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518397)

Sure, send me an email: http://www.leveluplabs.com/?pa... [leveluplabs.com] And let me know what you're dealing with. Chances are it's a haxelibs issue.

Re:Native Targets? (1)

Bryan Ischo (893) | about 5 months ago | (#46518759)

It cannot skip the native C++ step. The cpp target of haxe always generates C++ code and always compiles it to produce a native binary.

Re:Native Targets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518181)

And I'd be interested in letting random websites execute arbitrary C++ code on my machine why exactly???

The whole notion of Flash is terrible -- no, I do not trust you or your advertisers to run code on my machine. No I do not think it makes your site any better, it makes it shittier and I won't use it.

It's that simple. And to date I've yet to find a single compelling reason of why I'd use Flash in the first place. And, for the same reason, this OpenFL is equally something I'm not interested in.

Re:Native Targets? (2)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518199)

It does not execute arbitrary C++ code on your machine. Did you even read the article? It's a lifeboat for flash developers to make, say, desktop games. IT IS NOT A NEW VERSION OF THE FLASH PLUGIN.

Re:Native Targets? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518255)

It's a lifeboat for flash developers to make, say, desktop games.

Flash developers shouldn't under any circumstances be making desktop games.

Re:Native Targets? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518403)

C++ is dead

Re:Native Targets? (3)

AvitarX (172628) | about 5 months ago | (#46518519)

The Binding of Isaac disagrees.

Great game!

Re: Native Targets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518667)

You have no idea what you are talking about.

Re:Native Targets? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518435)

It's a lifeboat for flash developers to make, say, desktop games.

That's two terrible ideas at the same time.

Flash developers don't need lifeboats, they need torpedoes.

Re:Native Targets? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518249)

To be honest... Random Websites can't have a worse track record than Adobe.

Re:Native Targets? (2)

YoungManKlaus (2773165) | about 5 months ago | (#46518841)

on the other hand, who really cares about getting access to your machine if you can get access to all the browser-based info through some js exploit?

Re:Native Targets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518195)

The author isn't placing any bets on Flash at all. He's actually doing the opposite, by switching to an open-source alternative, providing him with a familiar API and the ability to target multiple platforms natively. Haxe is pretty cool once you read up on it, though it's not for everyone: http://haxeflixel.com/documentation/why-haxe/

Re:Native Targets? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518271)

Woosh. You missed the point entirely. Haxe is a language that you compile down to other languages, which makes it very portable, unlike flash. It has a feeling like java/C++/c# going.

Here is a hello world:

      class Main
      {
              public static function main()
              {
                      trace("Hello world");
              }
      }

Re:Native Targets? (4, Interesting)

itsdapead (734413) | about 5 months ago | (#46518385)

Flash is no more native than HTML5. At this point it doesn't make sense to "place bets" on Flash at all, unless like the article author you've spent many years on Flash and are not interested in change.

Flash can create a 'native' PC or OS X app (OK, it consists of a standalone Flash player bundled with your flash App, but the practical upshot is the same unless some strange permutation of misconceptions has led you to expect 'bare metal' efficiency from something like Flash).

Flash was actually a great system if you wanted something to write relatively small, animated, resolution-independent applets that can be embedded on web pages and downloaded as pseudo-native PC/Mac apps (Java was obviously better at coping with substantial projects - but its been getting a bigger and bigger pain for non-techie end users to install). Of course, it got abused as a way to add gratuitous animation to websites, and its only merit as a video player was that it was less annoying than RealPlayer...

The real killer, though, is that it doesn't run on tablets... however, when it was briefly available on Android I tried some existing Flash stuff and it quickly turned out that Jobs was right - apart from the bloat and security nightmare, lots of existing Flash stuff just broke on a touch screen.

OpenFL is used by no one, Long Live HTML5! (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518065)

HTML5 is dead, Long Live ________! Hard to keep up.

Re:OpenFL is used by no one, Long Live HTML5! (1)

jc42 (318812) | about 5 months ago | (#46519037)

HTML5 is dead, Long Live ________! Hard to keep up.

________ is dead, Long Live ........! (It's clearly more compact, and its components don't run together confusingly like those _s do.)

Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (4, Interesting)

jellomizer (103300) | about 5 months ago | (#46518111)

Flash was one of the few holdouts of the Plugins era of the Netscape vs. IE Browser War. It came out because There wasn't a standard between the two for vector based graphics.
Flash worked in different browsers and across many different OS's so it got well accepted. Then Adobe for the most part didn't let go easily and created more and more stuff to it, to make it rather full featured, killing off Active X and Java Applets for standard web pages.

That said. HTML 5 is not perfect, however it does give us a lot of features that we think we should use flash for, and we really should follow the standards that comes part of the browser then rely on plugins.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (2)

mlts (1038732) | about 5 months ago | (#46518147)

Agreed, HTML5 is not perfect, but it is better than addons, and those are oftentimes the items that malware uses to gain control of the Web browser (and thus a foothold of at least a user context, if not full run of a machine.)

Of course, the irony is that you can use Flash Professional to make HTML5 content.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518343)

How is that ironic?

One of Flash' great selling points was the authoring tools. It only makes sense that those tools adapt to the changing times.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518367)

I have played around in a rather good-looking OpenGL-rendered "world", with sound, in HTML5 + WebGL. That was to display "quality" is possible.

The moron trying to convince me "Flash!" (don't! forget! the! '!') is anything but vermin advertisers "toy" (the not-animated-gif-version of Spank The Monkey!) and the most successful virus delivery vehicle of all times (after 2048 Windows versions themselves) since the plague, better be prepared to defend himself in a thermonuclear war - where everyone is out to kill him, and Adobe is his only ally.

Wanna bet on the outcome? I give a million dollars on the cent. Hell, with a captcha as "flushed (the movie "Flushed Away") I give a billion dollars on the millicent.

More than vector graphics (4, Insightful)

enos (627034) | about 5 months ago | (#46518379)

Flash became dominant because it filled many real needs. Vector graphics is just one. It also brought creation tools so artists could work with it, it brought a scripting environment fast enough to use in a browser. Like you say, it also brought commonality to all the different browsers. This means that Flash brought a lot of features to the masses:
  - browser games. These were known as Schockwave or Flash games.
  - usable online multimedia. Yes there were video sites, but they became far more usable and reliable with Flash video.
  - rich design. As much as we hate them for all their inherent problems (and I do too), the fact is that before HTML+CSS caught up the only way to implement a crazy design was with Flash.
  - rich typography. We've only got proper font support very recently. That means the website can define its own font, not simply choose among the handful of Web fonts one could assume were available on the client.

Yes you could do video with native plugins like WMPlayer. Do you remember how terrible that was? Half the videos wouldn't play because of some unknown problem with codecs or such. When FLV came in it was great. Despite its problems, it brought reliability. I don't think YouTube would have become as successful as it is without Flash. Same with audio.

Despite its many problems, Flash brought a rich, standard interface to the web when nobody else could.

Re:More than vector graphics (0)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 5 months ago | (#46518827)

Now all of those features are available without a plugin. Why create a new plugin to implement them?

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518469)

What you're missing here is that this is proof that Linux is winning. Flash had no place to go because of the bolstering marketshare that Linux is taking over. It's known that Linux makes up an easy 20% of all machines on the internet today with as many Linux downloads as there are from primary and mirror sites, as well as BT downloads.
 
I know the Windoze and AppleSux boys will tell you differently but Linux is well established in the mainstream. The proof is in the numbers.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518725)

So where ARE your SuperAwesomeProofNumbers?

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46519149)

You forgot us LinuxSux boys. Linux on the desktop, oh umm tablet maybe. Never on the desktop outside of the fringes, like slashdot.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (3, Insightful)

ProzacPatient (915544) | about 5 months ago | (#46518687)

HTML 5 is not perfect, however it does give us a lot of features that we think we should use flash for, and we really should follow the standards that comes part of the browser then rely on plugins.

HTML 5 is ideal but one of my problems with using pure HTML and JavaScript for certain tasks is that implementation can vary wildly and performance even more so. Browser A might implement only a part of the standard, Browser B might implement the entire standard and Browser C has no support and worse is when all of them fully support the standard but Browser A is super slow compared to Browser B and Browser C is basically unusable. I've also seen a few JavaScript intensive websites demand you use only Chrome and I think this is a symptom of these problems.

As bad as proprietary plugins are at least it'll always have a consistent implementation across browsers and perform, in the case of Flash, equally bad across all the browsers.

Its not that I don't support the idea of cross-platform and cross-browser HTML5 solutions for tasks previously only accomplished through Flash but I think people often fail to understand it isn't all unicorns and rainbows as its made out to be.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (3, Insightful)

Lennie (16154) | about 5 months ago | (#46519117)

It also works the other way around. If people don't use the browser features, browser manufactures won't work on improving them.

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518865)

Don't forget: Flash is used for far more than just web-based bullshit. Animation studios will continue to use to produce things like Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, My Little Pony, and Teen Titans Go! because it's so much cheaper/faster than other methods. As long as you're looking at 2D, Flash can do almost everything you can get out of traditional methods and you can throw your renders into PS/AI for tweaking if you need to touch up a frame.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Flash_animated_television_series

Re:Open Standards, Not stupid plugins. (2)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | about 5 months ago | (#46518975)

Then Adobe for the most part didn't let go easily

Actually, Adobe offered to opensource ActionScript (Flash's language) to be adopted as the update to JavaScript, but some stupid argument about... XML parsing(?) lead to some holy war where the ECMA-scripts parted. Which is too bad. Because ActionScript supports object oriented code.

Security? (0)

schwit1 (797399) | about 5 months ago | (#46518145)

How is openflash supposed to more secure than adobe flash?

How do we know this isn't an NSA front organization?

Re:Security? (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518159)

Maybe because all the code is open source and you can inspect it yourself? http://www.github.com/openfl [github.com]

Re:Security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518739)

How do we know this isn't an NSA front organization?
How do we know you dont work for the NSA?

That is some quality paranoia you have there...

Oh happy day (2, Funny)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | about 5 months ago | (#46518151)

Die you bastard die!!!
How can we make sure it doesn't come back from the dead. Zombie Flash.
Take off and nuke Adobe headquarters from orbit... It's the only way to be sure.

Re:Oh happy day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518727)

Nuking Adobe headquarters from orbit is overkill. Nuke's are expensive and there are so many more deserving targets even just in the US such as the NSA, Monsanto headquarters, and wherever Chris Dodd is.

Re:Oh happy day (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46519099)

Yes, it is a very happy day.
Flash always been crap.

QML or HTML5 (2)

scorp1us (235526) | about 5 months ago | (#46518185)

It looks like if you don't want to deal with Flash, you have basically two options: Qt's QML for non-web-pages or HTML for web-pages.
Soon though, thanks to QMLWeb [kde.org] , you'll be able to use QML-to-JS in the browser.

Re:QML or HTML5 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518269)

Reading Comprehension: He WANTS to deal with flash.

Hard to believe I know... but Stockholm syndrome is a bitch.

Re:QML or HTML5 (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518281)

You clearly did not read the article.

Re:QML or HTML5 (1)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518909)

Have you looked into Haxe and OpenFL? Or maybe read the article?

To Clarify (5, Informative)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518187)

It seems a lot of people either didn't RTFA or are basically misunderstanding what OpenFL is. OpenFL is NOT an open source version of the flash Flash Plugin, like Gnash. OpenFL is a code library written in Haxe. You use OpenFL, and then you can output a truly native (C++) app, but can still use the flash API. It doesn't embed the flash player, or Adobe AIR, or anything like that, in your generated C++ app. You can use this to create truly native apps for mac/windows/linux/mobile, etc. Very recently they've added the ability to output to HTML5: http://www.openfl.org/blog/201... [openfl.org] So you can take your old flash code, port it to Haxe, and then have a 100% Javascript based HTML5 game. And you can take that same Haxe code and make a native C++ app with it. And so on. Hope this helps demystify things.

Re:To Clarify (5, Funny)

richy freeway (623503) | about 5 months ago | (#46518325)

Can someone mod this guy down please? He's clouding the discussion with facts.

Re:To Clarify (1)

rahvin112 (446269) | about 5 months ago | (#46518967)

Doesn't he know this is Slasthdot? Facts are neither required nor requested!

Re:To Clarify (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 5 months ago | (#46518399)

So it's a way not to learn a new language. Is there a danger of as the flash api is not updated possibly losing out where things like HTML5 while not perfect, gets perfected?

Re:To Clarify (3, Informative)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518413)

Again, you clearly did not read the article. For people who hate the Flash API, there is lime: https://github.com/openfl/lime [github.com]

Re:To Clarify (2)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 5 months ago | (#46518501)

OK, so they rely on a spin off project on it's own, and the rest of the world goes on with HTML5 which will continue to be improved and expanded. Which one will provide more use in the long run? So, OpenFL, is a way to avoid learning new technology. Hopefully it doesn't lead people down a one way street.

Re:To Clarify (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518549)

OpenFL supports HTML5: http://www.openfl.org/blog/201... [openfl.org] So any improvements to HTML5 will also benefit OpenFL. What OpenFL solves is the issue of "shit, my platform holder's investors got bored and yanked the rug out from under me, time to build my workflow back together from scratch!" By using Haxe, I can preserve my codebase and pivot to whatever the hot next technology is without having to bet on any one platform. I see that as a feature, not a bug.

Re:To Clarify (1)

theshowmecanuck (703852) | about 5 months ago | (#46518637)

As a cushion then, while one comes up to speed on something else. Sounds fair enough.

Re:To Clarify (1)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518771)

Or as a way of targeting a range of different platforms using a familiar and proven API without needing to learn a different language or worry about understanding the low-level architecture for each platform. By producing a native application for each platform, which targets the hardware directly, it also maximises performance without the overhead of an interpreter or renderer.

Re:To Clarify (1)

amicusNYCL (1538833) | about 5 months ago | (#46518741)

I didn't see it on their site, but is there a list of features from Flash that they do or don't support? It seems that some things, like cross-domain requests, wouldn't be possible if they went from Flash to Javascript/HTML5.

Re:To Clarify (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518835)

There's a few things here and there, not sure if there's an actual list. If you target flash, obviously you have all flash functionality available, but certain things (such as super-advanced international text field support) still need to be added on various targets. HTML5 is a brand new target so that's the least mature, whereas mobile and desktop targets have really good coverage. A "list of gaps we need to fill" would definitely a good feature to add to the OpenFL site, though.

Re:To Clarify (1)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518889)

The vast majority of the Flash API is available and cross-platform communication is possible through web sockets. Take a look at https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com] for a nice demo of one such project.

Route away from Adobe AIR (1)

rsborg (111459) | about 5 months ago | (#46518769)

OpenFL is a code library written in Haxe. You use OpenFL, and then you can output a truly native (C++) app, but can still use the flash API. It doesn't embed the flash player, or Adobe AIR, or anything like that, in your generated C++ app.

So is this a possible migration path for those who were using Adobe AIR? If it's C++, could it tie in with Apple's ObjectiveC framework and thus create deployable apps in the Mac App Store?

Re:Route away from Adobe AIR (1)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518813)

It already does! You can make native-binary mobile apps for ios and android using OpenFL, RIGHT NOW.

Re:Route away from Adobe AIR (1)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518857)

You can already create native iOS and OS X apps using OpenFL, along with Android, Windows, Linux, Flash and HTML5. There's nothing to stop you selling these apps through the various stores.

I thought it was Apple's fault (1, Funny)

Russ1642 (1087959) | about 5 months ago | (#46518285)

Apple's footprints were found at the crime scene.

You Said "Flash" (2, Interesting)

The Cat (19816) | about 5 months ago | (#46518295)

Therefore every asshole on this site will shout you down no matter what you actually wrote in the article. They don't even know why they hate Flash. They just join in because it's the latest "I are programmer" meme. (The last programmer to attempt to post anything useful on this site left ten years ago)

Never mind that Flash has been responsible for tens of billions of dollars in economic value.

Never mind that from 1993 to date, Flash is the only technology that has provided attractive animation and video on the web.

Never mind that the loudest and most obnoxious anti-Flash assholes have had TWENTY ONE YEARS to come up with a viable alternative, and so far they've produced nothing but bullshit-coated bullshit.

Never mind that in 2014, we STILL don't have decent HTML5 authoring tools. Oh sure, it's built in to tools that output everything else + HTML5, but HTML5 itself? Nope. Nothing even remotely close to Flash CS6.

Never mind that in 2014 HTML5 still doesn't have decent synchronized sound support.

Never mind that the way problems like this used to get solved would be that web developers (Andressen, Joy, Davis, Clark, Yang) would get together and solve them. Now people just bitch, wipe their ass on the tablecloth, bitch some more and go back to their bong.

Awww, you can't mod it down. Guess you'll have to grow up and face the facts. Lazy, illiterate, talentless, worthless ASSHOLES are all that's left in this hate-machine cult. Go back to your fucking LoL Twitch feeds.

Re:You Said "Flash" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518447)

Flash - yes, that bastion of accessibility for vision / hearing impaired people. That champion of open standards and the open web. Or at least, the open exploit web.

Flash, single handedly heating up laptops everywhere when playing a video.

What a piece of shit it is.

Re:You Said "Flash" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518763)

Thanks for proving his point in one epic display of fucktardedness.

Re:You Said "Flash" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518921)

Go back to convserapeedia The Cat.

You can show off your guns and talk about jesus in the forums.

Re:You Said "Flash" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518493)

If God wanted Flash it make it HTML Flash

Re:You Said "Flash" (1)

lgw (121541) | about 5 months ago | (#46519235)

I remember when COBOL could make similarly important-sounding claims. Didn't change the fact that COBOL blows goats.

No Flash, no regrets (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518317)

Flash was bad from the start and html5 and what not is just an extension of the same bad idea imo.. It is literally flash(sparkly) at the expense of function and another avenue for security exploits.

Youtube? I use a downloader app, keep local copies of anything remotely interesting.

Since ebay started using html5ucked, it takes many times longer to view the same content. All that impage overlapping crap. Before, you'd middle-click an item, middle click image after image and all are loaded for quick detailed viewing.. Now you must hover over the image, click it, then right click and open to view the actual full resolution.

Function over form you retarded punk developers.. Mind you if they didn't use all the new crap just for new sake, they wouldn't like be able to do their job or be unemployed since it would be all 'done/working'.

which (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518407)

I have used downloader apps on youtube, but it seems they work for a few weeks then stop working. Update, then try again, still hit and miss getting a clean download. What are you using that provides consistently good downloads?

Re:No Flash, no regrets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518595)

"Youtube? I use a downloader app, keep local copies of anything remotely interesting."

That's all well and fine, but you are aware that you're part of a tiny minority of deranged lunatics, right?

Re: No Flash, no regrets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518735)

Leave him alone--I used to do the same thing when I had dial-up too.

Re:No Flash, no regrets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46519241)

You're describing a use case problem, not a technical flaw with HTML5.

Well, well. (1)

azav (469988) | about 5 months ago | (#46518369)

Just like before when I saw Macromedia let Flash kill Director and Shockwave.

Damn shame. It was such an awesome product.

FYI, Director's Lingo looks a whole lot like today's Lua.

Cheers to those of us who helped make it and those of us who took it and used it to start a great career.

I miss Director.

Mobile (1)

fermion (181285) | about 5 months ago | (#46518417)

Flash is dead and Apple killed it. Sure, Google promised it to save it with android, but they could not. Flash is a resource hit and if Apple was not going to learn how to make it work, who else has the money?

An open flash clone might be ok because it does not matter that it will not run on the devices most of the world are going to be using in the near future. These app can be legacy, like the stuff that requires IE. But it is just like Java which has fallen 25%. People will figure out how to make HTML5 work, and work better, so they can access as many customers as possible.

Re:Mobile (2)

lars_doucet (2853771) | about 5 months ago | (#46518429)

OpenFL already runs on tons of mobile devices, natively. Clearly, you did not read the article.

Re:Mobile (1)

Psicopatico (1005433) | about 5 months ago | (#46518673)

- "Thou shalt not read The Fine Article!"
Alas, I bow my head and obey.

Stage3D? (2)

BenJeremy (181303) | about 5 months ago | (#46518473)

Can OpenFL handle something like Stage3D and wrappers like Starling?

I've used Haxe in the past, but found it lacking in support of things like sound and sprite animation for writing mobile games.

Re:Stage3D? (2)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518829)

There are projects underway to create a common API which targets Stage3D, OpenGL and WebGL, but with a bit of work you can do 3D already. Whilst nobody to my knowledge is working on a port of Starling at present, there are great ports of Flixel and FlashPunk already, along with a range of alternative game engines.

NO! (-1)

Billly Gates (198444) | about 5 months ago | (#46518665)

Anything that can run executable code without a sandbox on an untrusted website is stupid. Adobe flash at least has a sandbox and a team of people fixing vulnerabilities and yet it is still one of the top targets outside of java.Browser bugs are so last decade now.

It is time to move on and it is not fair for mobile users. HTML 5 and CSS 3 support mobile features and resizing quite well as Apple was the one who promoted it for their iOS apps.

Re:NO! (1)

grayhaze (3582431) | about 5 months ago | (#46518801)

Read the article. You're commenting on something completely unrelated. This isn't about creating an insecure alternative to the Flash plugin.

Re:NO! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46519041)

No, they don't. They only support mobile features and resizing the interface to the pixel count of the screen. They're fucking murder on people with poor vision and other adaptations.

Flash and linux (1)

Grindalf (1089511) | about 5 months ago | (#46518677)

If you download “Google Chrome” as opposed to “chromium” for linux, from Google, it has a completely up to date flash plugin built in. It installs with a right click in Debian, and is easy to add to any distro that you're making ...

I'm not so sure about it being in death throes yet (2)

mark-t (151149) | about 5 months ago | (#46518797)

As long as employers (game devs, in particular) are willing to keep paying people to write it, I'm pretty sure it's going to stay popular.

Wait, how is OpenFL doing this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518873)

So, how does OpenFL replace Flash, I was pretty sure that Flash's main competitor was memristors.

Re:Wait, how is OpenFL doing this? (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 5 months ago | (#46519225)

I thought it was Flash that was doing the replacing - of both tape drives as well as hard disks

Why something other than Java or dot net? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46518895)

Doesn't anyone remember back when native code was considered dead? This was all worked out. There were 2 major, well developed VMs, or JITs, Java and Dot Net. Why bother with anything else?

As for the unemployed Flash authors, wasn't the ubiquity of Flash a large part of its appeal? Why should the general public get used to some new, unknown thing, when there is JVM and Dot Net? Flash is over. Get over it. Learn something else.

Slashdot is dead (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 5 months ago | (#46519137)

this place looks like trash now. is this slashdot web 2.0?

Let Flash die (1)

dimeglio (456244) | about 5 months ago | (#46519197)

It been a fun ride but it needs to go. The use of Flash is preventing more open technologies like HTML5 from moving forward in order to support all what Flash used to do.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>